Create Kid Lit Inspired Masks

Making crafts with your kids or students is a great way to teach them about different forms of art and culture. Also, it’s a great way to take advantage of quality time. If you’re interested in making crafts with your kids, we have the perfect tutorial for you.

What time is it? It’s time to make some kid lit inspired masks!

In celebration of the most wonderful time of the year for many children and adults, we’ve decided to create a few masks inspired by kid lit! You don’t have to be a great crafter to make these masks either. If you have an imagination (and the tools below), you can make one or all of the masks. Keep in mind crafting is about being creative, rather than being perfect. Have fun!

Masks Inspired By
Little Elliot, Big City
Have You Seen My Monster? and Have You Seen My Dragon?
Wolfie the Bunny

Tools
Your favorite kid lit (for reference)
Mask template, or an old soft/fabric mask you feel comfortable wearing
Scissors
Pencil
Black gel ink pen
Cardstock
Construction paper
Glue or Mod Podge (for paper)
Elastic string
Colored pencils
Eraser
Markers
Household items of varying shapes/circumferences, circle punch, or circle cutter
T-pin or small pin, to punch tiny holes

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Difficulty: Easy
Little Elliot, Big City
Written and illustrated by Mike Curato

This mask is the easiest to make. A simple white background and a few colored (light pink and light blue) circles are all you need.

Directions

  • Use your mask template, or trace the outline of your preferred soft mask onto white cardstock.
  • Cut out the mask shape.
  • Use a circle punch, circle cutter, or dime (trace), to make circles on light pink and light blue cardstock or construction paper.
  • Paste the light blue and light pink circles on the white mask, to mimic Elliot’s polka dots. Press and hold each dot for 15 seconds, after adhering it to the mask shape.
  • Punch a tiny hole, with a T-pin (or small, pointy object), on each side of the mask.
  • Cut a piece of elastic string to size, to fit around the back of your head.
  • Insert the elastic string through the tiny holes you’ve made on each side of the mask. Knot each end.
  • Place the mask over your head.

Voila! You are Little Elliot! Treat yourself to a cupcake.

WATCH: Mike Curato’s Little Elliot, Big City Read Out Loud episode

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Difficulty: Moderate
Wolfie the Bunny
Written by Ame Dyckman and illustrated by Zachariah OHora

This mask has more difficulty than the Little Elliot mask because it involves three layers, more cutting, and some freehand drawing.

Directions

  • Use your mask template, or trace the outline of your prefered soft mask onto white cardstock.
  • Cut out the mask shape.
  • Place the mask shape you’ve cut out on a gray piece of cardstock or construction paper, trace the shape, then cut out the gray mask.

Now, here’s the tricky part …

  • Place either of the shapes you’ve cut out on a pink piece of cardstock or construction paper; lightly trace that shape.
  • Now, you’re going to make Wolfie’s stubby ears. You can draw his ears freehand, or make a stencil by folding a 4″ x 1.5″ piece of plain paper in half, then cutting around the outer edges to create a symmetrical shape.
  • Unfold the stencil and place it about ¾” away from the edge of the mask, trace the ear shape. Repeat on the other side of the mask.
  • Cut out the new mask shape with bunny ears.
  • Once you’ve cut out the mask shape with bunny ears you’ll have to go back in to make another cut. Take a look at the image above. As you can see, the pink mask area resembles Wolfie’s hoodie.
  • Cut away most of the pink construction paper so you have a thin (not too thin) outline.
  • Paste the gray mask shape onto the white mask shape; this makes it extra sturdy.
  • Then, carefully align and paste the pink bunny eared mask shape over the gray mask shape.
  • Place the glued components under a heavy book for about five minutes. Be sure to place plain paper on both sides of the mask — accidents happen.

Ooh, you are so close!

  • Now, you can remove the mask from the book, it should be firm.
  • Take a look at the book to get an idea of how Wolfie’s hair is drawn. Use a marker, or colored pencil to create strong black strokes on the gray portion of the mask.
  • Outline the interior of the pink mask to emulate Wolfie’s hoodie.
  • Freehand draw those awesome upside down “U”s to complete Wolfie’s ears.
  • Punch a tiny hole, with a T-pin (or small, pointy object), on each side of the mask.
  • Cut a piece of elastic string to size, to fit around the back of your head.
  • Insert the elastic string through the tiny holes you’ve made on each side of the mask. Knot each end.
  • Place the mask over your head.

Is this mask gonna eat you all up? Are you going to eat anyone up because you’re wearing this mask?

WATCH: Ame Dyckman and Zachariah OHora’s Wolfie the Bunny Read Out Loud episode

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Difficulty: Hard
Have You Seen My Monster?
Written and illustrated by Steve Light

Have You Seen My Dragon?
Written and illustrated by Steve Light

This mask is a bit more difficult to make. The mask is a mashup of Steve Light’s fantastic counting and shape books! Steve Light loves details and this will help a child (or adult) exercise those fine motor skills.

Eek! You’ll be drawing a dragon and a monster.

Directions

  • Use your mask template, or trace the outline of your prefered soft mask onto white cardstock.
  • Cut out the mask shape.
  • Draw your best version of Steve’s dragon, on green paper (construction paper or cardstock). Trace the dragon if you need to, but be careful not to ruin your book.
  • Add some detail! Draw dragon’s scales, eyes … those great ridges on his back!
  • Cut out your dragon shape. 
  • Optional: Lightly color in dragon’s scales with a yellow pencil.
  • Draw your best version of Steve’s monster, on purple paper (construction paper or cardstock). Trace the monster if you need to, but be careful not to ruin your book.
  • Add some detail! Draw monster’s hair, his beady eyes, and his crusty feet!
  • Cut out your monster shape. 

Dragon and monster look and feel better right above the eye holes.

  • Glue the monster and dragon above the eye holes.
  • More freehand drawing! Choose some of your favorite scenes from the book to continue decorating the mask.
  • Color in some, but not all of the details.
  • Punch a tiny hole, with a T-pin (or small, pointy object), on each side of the mask.
  • Cut a piece of elastic string to size, to fit around the back of your head.
  • Insert the elastic string through the tiny holes you’ve made on each side of the mask. Knot each end.
  • Place the mask over your head.

Have you seen your monster? Have you seen your dragon? They’re on your face, silly!

WATCH: Steve Light’s StoryMakers episode

There you have it, a few masks inspired by kid lit. We hope this will inspire all the little makers out there to challenge themselves!  Again, it’s all about having fun and being creative. Do feel free to add glitter, sequins, feathers, confetti, and whatever else to your mask!

Are you planning to make any of these masks? Let us know in the comment section.

Also, feel free to share any masks you make to our Facebook page. We’d love to show off your work.

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